Java, Fedora, and Xen Support: All on Calxeda

With the allure of a good book on the beach stealing everyone’s attention this summer, you may have missed three important developments in the Linux community to support ARM in the datacenter.  The first was the announcement that with the new Fedora 19, Fedora has released ARM and x86 support simultaneously.  This was made possible, in part, thanks to a Boston Viridis build-farm installed earlier this year.  ARM support is now available in media and installer images for TI OMAP4, nVidia Tegra 2, and Calxeda ECX-1000 (Highbank).  This represents a key milestone in providing complete Linux packages for ARM based development, appropriate for customers who roll-their-own OS from open source.  (Note that the Ubuntu community already enjoys a fully supported enterprise OS for ARM, thanks to the work of Canonical Ltd, a long-time supporter of the ARM architecture.)

Next on deck for your summer reading pleasure,  is the release  of Xen 4.3 for ARM V7 and V8 architectures by the Xen Project, enabling hypervisor support for 32- and 64-bit ARM SOCs.  Once again, this work was done on a Calxeda-based Boston Viridis system.

Finally,  today ARM and Oracle announced the next phase of their collaborative relationship to optimize Javafor ARM-based servers and embedded SOCs, extending their work to 32- and 64-bit optimization:

  • Agreement will provide ARM architecture support for key markets e.g. data centers, network infrastructure and embedded computing
  • Oracle JVM optimized further for 32-bit products and ported over and optimized for ARMv8 64-bit
  • Additional areas for co-operation include improving boot-up performancepower savings and library optimization

Note that Oracle Java SE is a fundamental technology for all of the market areas mentioned above.

Ok, back to the beach…

HostingCon 2013: InterWorx Control Panel running on EnergyCore demo video now posted

Live from HostingCon, we’ve posted a video of Brett from Interworx demoing the Interworx control panel and clustering technology on a 24 server Calxeda system. To see the cluster in action for yourself, tweet @InterWorxArm and see what the cluster has to say. We’ll keep the twitter demo running until the end of HostingCon.

Check out the demo video below:

 

HostingCon 2013: See InterWorx Control Panel running on EnergyCore at the Calxeda booth

interworxHostingCon 2013 is right around the corner, so I’d like to give everyone a preview of the work that our partner InterWorx has done to get their control panel and clustering technology running on our gear. Ever since the spike in interest from World Hosting Days back in March, we’ve been working hard to enable hosting providers to create Calxeda-based offerings. A key part of that is the hosting control panel, and we’re pleased to be working with InterWorx on creating the first control panel compatible with ARM servers. With just a little bit of elbow grease, we’ve gotten the InterWorx control panel and clustering technology to run on one of our 24-node systems. We’ll be showing a live demo at HostingCon next week, so drop by the Calxeda booth (#905) to talk to us and the InterWorx team.

Inktank and Calxeda Partner to Transform Ceph Storage Solutions

CephToday, Calxeda announced a partnership with Inktank in which we will together optimize and promote Ceph-based solutions in the market. It’s obvious why Ceph has been gaining lots of traction lately: it has been selected by Ubuntu as an official package within their distribution, and also for its compatibility with OpenStack cloud deployments. What may not be as obvious, however, is why and how Calxeda enables “microserver” designs that are a perfect fit for distributed applications like Ceph.

As you might have seen from last week’s announcement at Computex in Taipei, two of the three debuted systems are targeting the storage server markets, with a few additional designs that can’t yet be disclosed. More and more system vendors and customers are starting to realize the synergy in new “scale-out hardware” built for this new emerging trend of distributed storage software. But why?
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Perspectives From Linaro Connect

– From Larry Wikelius,   Co-Founder and VP Ecosystems,  Calxeda:
The most recent Linaro Connect (Linaro Connect Asia 2013 – LCA), held in Hong Kong the first week of March, really put a spotlight on the incredible momentum around ARM based technology and products moving into the Data Center.  Yes – you read that correctly – the DATA CENTER!
When Linaro was originally launched almost three years ago the focus was exclusively on the mobile and client market – where ARM has and continues to be dominant.  However, as Calxeda has demonstrated, the opportunity for the ARM architecture goes well beyond devices that you carry in your pocket.  Calxeda was a key driver in the formation of the Linaro Enterprise Group (LEG), which was publicly launched at the previous LinaroConnect event in Copenhagen in early November, 2012.  LEG has been an exciting development for Linaro and now has 13 member companies that include server vendors such as Calxeda, Linux distribution companies Red Hat and Canonical, OEM representation from HP and even Hyperscale Data Center end user Facebook.  There were many sessions throughout the week that focused on Server specific topics such as UEFI, ACPI, Virtualization, Hyperscale Testing with LAVA and Distributed Storage.  Calxeda was very active throughout the week with the team participating directly in a number of roadmap definition sessions, presenting on Server RAS and providing guidance in key areas such as application optimization and compiler focus for Servers.

Dell & Apache: More than just a donation

Today’s Dell announcement of their donation to the Apache Software Foundation is a huge milestone not only for Calxeda but the entire ARM server ecosystem. Supporting and engaging the open-source community has always been a high priority for the Round Rock based company, evidenced by their contributions and leadership in multiple open-source projects like OpenStack and other Apache projects. But this particular announcement is more than just a generous donation to a non-profit foundation.

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Oracle Java Update Shows Future For ARM

Yesterday, Oracle made announcements regarding a few product lines including a subtle “update” release for Java SE 7 Update 6. While only an “update” for the Java community, this release is a significant milestone not only for Calxeda, but the entire ARM ecosystem. Java SE 7 Update 6 now introduces a general-purpose port of the JDK to Linux ARM.  Here are a few of the highlights and some commentary on what this means for Calxeda:

  • With the addition of the JDK port to ARM (previously only the JRE was available), Oracle is showing their support and belief in the emerging ARM server market.
  • There is a 32-bit binary for the ARMv6 and v7 instruction sets, with both client (C1) and server (C2) compilers. That means that it a) natively supports the Cortex-A9 cores in our SOC, and b) provides a server optimized compiler.
  • The ARM architecture is now treated as a “first class citizen” by the Oracle Java SE team, which means it is treated like all general-purpose JDK and JRE binaries from both a licensing and distribution perspective (under the Oracle Binary Code License):
    • The ARM JDK is free for development and production use on general-purpose platforms.
    • The binaries can be redistributed for free with applications targeting a general-purpose computer/server.
  • With a fully supported version of Oracle Java now available for ARM servers, customers should feel confident about their Java apps running on Calxeda hardware. (While OpenJDK is available, we have seen Oracle’s JVM to be up to 5-6X faster in some instances.)
  • The one caveat that remains is that Oracle Java SE 7 remains “softfloat ABI” only, which means that it will only run on Ubuntu today with Calxeda hardware. We will have updated installation instructions for Ubuntu available by end of this week.

Oracle’s commitment to the ARM architecture is a great sign of what’s to come for this ecosystem. Looking into their crystal ball, they clearly see the opportunity before them and the alignment with their strategy. Henrik Stahl, Sr. Director of Product Management in the Java Platform Group at Oracle, said it best in his blog post — when asked why Oracle is investing in an ARM port and then giving it away for free, he replied: “We have a super-secret agenda. The idea is to enable Java developers so that Java can continue to thrive, and maybe sell some middleware on ARM servers down the line.

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